healthy chicken casserole

Healthy Chicken Casserole

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This healthy chicken casserole recipe hits the spot.

Recently I treated you all to my mothers chicken and vegetable soup recipe, and I loved the flavour combinations there, so I thought I would turn it into a healthy chicken casserole, with the aid of the Hairy Bikers!

I was reading their Hairy Dieters book you see, and it gave me the inspiration to create this one pot wonder, which went down very well with some mashed potato.

I think you’ll love it too.

Healthy Chicken Casserole Recipe

Ingredients

  • 3 Chicken Legs
  • 50g Flour
  • 1 tsp Mixed Herbs
  • 2 sticks of Celery, chopped finely
  • 1 Leek, chopped finely
  • 4 rashers of Bacon
  • 1 Red Onion, chopped finely
  • 5 button Mushrooms
  • 2 Carrots
  • 1 Pint of Chicken Stock

Directions

Pre-heat your oven to 180c/350F

Add the flour and herbs into a bowl, use it to cover the chicken legs completely. Fry the legs in a frying pan until brown, before adding to a casserole dish.

Fry the bacon, celery and red onion for 10mins. Add to the casserole dish with the chicken legs. Add in the carrots and mushrooms.

Sprinkle over the remaining flour mix and then add the chicken stock.

Cook in the oven for 1 hour. It will be good and thick so mix it thoroughly.

Add the leeks and cook for a further 40mins.

Serve with some mashed potato.

Your healthy chicken casserole is now ready to be frozen if you wish, you can do so in containers for up to 3 months.

Healthy Chicken Casserole – Cookware

Great on a Budget
Pyrex 556A000T443 Round Casserole Dish with Lid, 3.5 L, Clear Glass, 20 Year Guarantee
LE CREUSET Signature Enamelled Cast Iron Round Casserole Dish with Lid, 26 cm, 5.3 Litre, Satin Black, 211772600
Cast Iron Casserole Dish With Lid | Pre-Seasoned Slow Cooking Pot | Iron Dutch Oven | Non-Stick Cookware Dish | Black Roasting Cooker | M&W
Recommended
Cookware Bottom Cast Iron Dutch Oven,Casserole Dish with lid,Non Stick Enamel Coating,Good Sealing,Lightweight,for All Heat Source,Pot's Body Cast Aluminium Soup Pot 4.0 L 24cm×11cm(D×H),3~5 People
Pyrex 556A000T443 Round Casserole Dish with Lid, 3.5 L, Clear Glass, 20 Year Guarantee
LE CREUSET Signature Enamelled Cast Iron Round Casserole Dish with Lid, 26 cm, 5.3 Litre, Satin Black, 211772600
Cast Iron Casserole Dish With Lid | Pre-Seasoned Slow Cooking Pot | Iron Dutch Oven | Non-Stick Cookware Dish | Black Roasting Cooker | M&W
Cookware Bottom Cast Iron Dutch Oven,Casserole Dish with lid,Non Stick Enamel Coating,Good Sealing,Lightweight,for All Heat Source,Pot's Body Cast Aluminium Soup Pot 4.0 L 24cm×11cm(D×H),3~5 People
Price not available
£183.20
Price not available
Price not available
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-
-
-
Great on a Budget
Pyrex 556A000T443 Round Casserole Dish with Lid, 3.5 L, Clear Glass, 20 Year Guarantee
Pyrex 556A000T443 Round Casserole Dish with Lid, 3.5 L, Clear Glass, 20 Year Guarantee
Price not available
-
LE CREUSET Signature Enamelled Cast Iron Round Casserole Dish with Lid, 26 cm, 5.3 Litre, Satin Black, 211772600
LE CREUSET Signature Enamelled Cast Iron Round Casserole Dish with Lid, 26 cm, 5.3 Litre, Satin Black, 211772600
£183.20
-
Cast Iron Casserole Dish With Lid | Pre-Seasoned Slow Cooking Pot | Iron Dutch Oven | Non-Stick Cookware Dish | Black Roasting Cooker | M&W
Cast Iron Casserole Dish With Lid | Pre-Seasoned Slow Cooking Pot | Iron Dutch Oven | Non-Stick Cookware Dish | Black Roasting Cooker | M&W
Price not available
-
Recommended
Cookware Bottom Cast Iron Dutch Oven,Casserole Dish with lid,Non Stick Enamel Coating,Good Sealing,Lightweight,for All Heat Source,Pot's Body Cast Aluminium Soup Pot 4.0 L 24cm×11cm(D×H),3~5 People
Cookware Bottom Cast Iron Dutch Oven,Casserole Dish with lid,Non Stick Enamel Coating,Good Sealing,Lightweight,for All Heat Source,Pot's Body Cast Aluminium Soup Pot 4.0 L 24cm×11cm(D×H),3~5 People
Price not available
-

Healthy Chicken Casserole – Ingredient Information

Every healthy chicken casserole has to start somewhere, below is a full breakdown of the ingredients, with thanks to our friends at Wikipedia for providing us with the details.

Chicken

healthy chicken casserole
Photo by Alison Marr

More than 50 billion chickens are reared annually as a source of meat and eggs. In the United States alone, more than 8 billion chickens are slaughtered each year for meat, and more than 300 million chickens are reared for egg production.

The vast majority of poultry are raised in factory farms. According to the Worldwatch Institute, 74 percent of the world’s poultry meat and 68 percent of eggs are produced this way. An alternative to intensive poultry farming is free-range farming.

Friction between these two main methods has led to long-term issues of ethical consumerism. Opponents of intensive farming argue that it harms the environment, creates human health risks and is inhumane. Advocates of intensive farming say that their highly efficient systems save land and food resources owing to increased productivity, and that the animals are looked after in state-of-the-art environmentally controlled facilities.

Chickens farmed for meat are called broilers. Chickens will naturally live for six or more years, but broiler breeds typically take less than six weeks to reach slaughter size. A free range or organic broiler will usually be slaughtered at about 14 weeks of age.

Chickens farmed primarily for eggs are called layer hens. In total, the UK alone consumes more than 34 million eggs per day.

Some hen breeds can produce over 300 eggs per year, with “the highest authenticated rate of egg laying being 371 eggs in 364 days”. 

After 12 months of laying, the commercial hen’s egg-laying ability starts to decline to the point where the flock is commercially unviable. Hens, particularly from battery cage systems, are sometimes infirm or have lost a significant amount of their feathers, and their life expectancy has been reduced from around seven years to less than two years.

In the UK and Europe, laying hens are then slaughtered and used in processed foods or sold as “soup hens”.

In some other countries, flocks are sometimes force moulted, rather than being slaughtered, to re-invigorate egg-laying. This involves complete withdrawal of food (and sometimes water) for 7–14 days or sufficiently long to cause a body weight loss of 25 to 35%, or up to 28 days under experimental conditions.

This stimulates the hen to lose her feathers, but also re-invigorates egg-production. Some flocks may be force-moulted several times. In 2003, more than 75% of all flocks were moulted in the US.

With thanks to our friends at Wikipedia

Bacon

Bacon is a type of salt-cured pork.

Bacon is prepared from several different cuts of meat, typically from the pork belly or from back cuts, which have less fat than the belly. It is eaten on its own, as a side dish (particularly in breakfasts), or used as a minor ingredient to flavour dishes (e.g., the club sandwich). 

Bacon is also used for barding and larding roasts, especially game, including venison and pheasant. 

The word is derived from the Old High German bacho, meaning “buttock”, “ham” or “side of bacon”, and is cognate with the Old French bacon.

Meat from other animals, such as beef, lamb, chicken, goat, or turkey, may also be cut, cured, or otherwise prepared to resemble bacon, and may even be referred to as, for example, “turkey bacon”.

Such use is common in areas with significant Jewish and Muslim populations as both religions prohibit the consumption of pork.

Vegetarian bacon such as “soy bacon” also exist and attract vegetarians and vegans.

With thanks to our friends at Wikipedia

Flour

Flour is a powder made by grinding raw grains, roots, beans, nuts, or seeds. It is used to make many different foods. 

Cereal flour is the main ingredient of bread, which is a staple food for most cultures. 

Wheat flour is one of the most important ingredients in Oceanic, European, South American, North American, Middle Eastern, North Indian and North African cultures, and is the defining ingredient in their styles of breads and pastries.

Wheat is the most common base for flour. 

Corn flour has been important in Mesoamerican cuisine since ancient times and remains a staple in the Americas. 

Rye flour is a constituent of bread in central Europe.

Cereal flour consists either of the endosperm, germ, and bran together (whole-grain flour) or of the endosperm alone (refined flour). 

Meal is either differentiable from flour as having slightly coarser particle size (degree of comminution) or is synonymous with flour; the word is used both ways. 

For example, the word cornmeal often connotes a grittier texture whereas corn flour connotes fine powder, although there is no codified dividing line.

With thanks to our friends at Wikipedia

Chicken Stock

Stock is a flavored liquid preparation. It forms the basis of many dishes, particularly soups, stews and sauces. 

Making stocks involves simmering animal bones or meat, seafood, or vegetables in water or wine, adding mirepoix or other aromatics for more flavor.

With thanks to our friends at Wikipedia

Celery

Celery (Apium graveolens) is a marshland plant in the family Apiaceae that has been cultivated as a vegetable since antiquity. 

Celery has a long fibrous stalk tapering into leaves. Depending on location and cultivar, either its stalks, leaves or hypocotyl are eaten and used in cooking. 

Celery seed is also used as a spice and its extracts have been used in herbal medicine.

With thanks to our friends at Wikipedia

Leek

healthy chicken casserole
Photo by Immo Wegmann on Unsplash

The leek is a vegetable, a cultivar of Allium ampeloprasum, the broadleaf wild leek. 

The edible part of the plant is a bundle of leaf sheaths that is sometimes erroneously called a stem or stalk. 

The genus Allium also contains the onion, garlic, shallot, scallion, chive, and Chinese onion.

With thanks to our friends at Wikipedia

Red Onion

Red onions are cultivars of the onion (Allium cepa) with purplish-red skin and white flesh tinged with red.

These onions tend to be medium to large in size and have a mild flavor. 

They are often consumed raw, grilled or lightly cooked with other foods, or added as a decoration to salads. 

Red onions are available throughout the year and are high in flavonoids and fibre (compared to white and yellow onions).

Known varieties include ‘Red Zeppelin’.

The skin of the red onion has been used as a dye.

With thanks to our friends at Wikipedia

Mushroom

Agaricus bisporus is an edible basidiomycete mushroom native to grasslands in Europe and North America. It has two color states while immature—white and brown—both of which have various names. 

This mushroom is commonly sold under the name portobello mushroom (also portabella or portobella) but the etymology is disputed.

When immature and white, this mushroom may be known as common mushroom, white mushroom, button mushroom, cultivated mushroom, table mushroom, and champignon mushroom. 

When immature and brown, it may be known variously as Swiss brown mushroom, Roman brown mushroom, Italian brown mushroom, cremini/crimini mushroom, or chestnut mushroom.

A. bisporus is cultivated in more than seventy countries, and is one of the most commonly and widely consumed mushrooms in the world.

With thanks to our friends at Wikipedia

Carrots

The carrot (Daucus carota subsp. sativus) is a root vegetable, usually orange in colour, though purple, black, red, white, and yellow cultivars exist. 

They are a domesticated form of the wild carrot, Daucus carota, native to Europe and Southwestern Asia. 

The plant probably originated in Persia and was originally cultivated for its leaves and seeds. The most commonly eaten part of the plant is the taproot, although the stems and leaves are eaten as well. 

The domestic carrot has been selectively bred for its greatly enlarged, more palatable, less woody-textured taproot.

The carrot is a biennial plant in the umbellifer family Apiaceae. 

At first, it grows a rosette of leaves while building up the enlarged taproot. 

Fast-growing cultivars mature within three months (90 days) of sowing the seed, while slower-maturing cultivars need a month longer (120 days). 

The roots contain high quantities of alpha- and beta-carotene, and are a good source of vitamin K and vitamin B6, but the belief that eating carrots improves night vision is a myth put forward by the British in World War II to mislead the enemy about their military capabilities.

With thanks to our friends at Wikipedia

Healthy Chicken Casserole with Broccoli Recipe

I count myself really lucky to have been given the recipe for another type of healthy chicken casserole recipe, and inspiration for this Chicken Broccoli Bake, by my father in law Gerry.

Well he does this recipe slightly different, but I was creating this to be on a budget with calories, seeing as I am going through diet syndrome to get ready to fit into my suit.

Ingredients

  • 2 Chicken Breasts, cut into chunks
  • 2 Potatoes, sliced thinly
  • 1/2 head of Broccoli, cut into little pieces
  • 1 knob of Butter
  • 1 tbsp Flour
  • 1/2 Pint of Chicken Stock
  • 1 tsp Mustard
  • Salt & Pepper

Directions

Pre-heat your oven to 200C/400F

Add the chicken into an oven dish, and place in the oven for 10 minutes. Once complete, take out to cool.

Make a roux, by combining the butter and flour in a saucepan over a high heat. Add the chicken stock, mixing with a whisk to ensure you get no lumps. Mix until it is thick in consistency.

Add the mustard, salt and pepper to the mix, before adding the broccoli and chicken. Mix thoroughly together.

Put the chicken and broccoli mix into a casserole dish. Cover the top with the sliced potatoes, in whatever fancy way you would like.

Place back into the oven to bake until the potatoes are cooked, roughly around 40 minutes.

Your second healthy chicken casserole is ready to freeze, you can do so in containers for up to 3 months.

Healthy Chicken Casserole – Bonus Recipe

One of the best things to really focus on when making a healthy chicken casserole is the chiocken stock you make along with it.

Below you will find a video recipe showing you just how it is made.

Do you want the recipe? Ok, click here.

Healthy Chicken Casserole – FAQ

How many calories are there in this healthy chicken casserole?

Great question, there is 295 kcals per serving, if split in three.

What is the difference between a stew and a casserole?

Actually it is very simple. A stew is simply cooked on a stove or hob, whereas a casserole is cooked in the oven.

Is chicken and broccoli healthy?

Absolutely, they are very high in protein and fibre, which everyone needs to keep them upright.

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