chicken and vegetable soup

Chicken and Vegetable Soup

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Chicken and Vegetable Soup, or as we used to call it, “Homemade Soup” was a staple in our house growing up, as it takes the humblest of ingredients and transforms it into a soup that could feed the 5000.

Mixed with barley and peas, all manner of vegetables along with a few chicken legs, this one went on for days, continually bubbling on the stove, very much in the fashion of Grans stew.

I must admit I was never a fan, but I thought this time I would ask her for the recipe ,and cook it for myself, to see if it changed my mind. Naturally it did, so I want to share it with everyone.

Before we start though, you’ll note the recipe calls for soup mix. What is soup mix I hear you ask?

Well you can get it in all good supermarkets, and it is a pack of barley, lentils and split peas, that comes in a 500g pack.

Chicken and Vegetable Soup Recipe

Ingredients

  • 2 sticks of Celery
  • 2 Carrots
  • 2 Leeks
  • 1 head of Greens
  • 2 Onions
  • handful of Parsley
  • 250g Soup Mix
  • 3 Chicken Legs
  • 1.5 pints of Chicken Stock from 4 Stock Cubes
  • Salt & Pepper

I have also taken the time to turn this into a Casserole if your interested, click here for the recipe.

Directions

Add the soup mix into a bowl of water the night before you wish to make it, as it will need to re hydrate before cooking.

The next day, add it to a large stock pan, like the one pictured above. It is important to have a big pot, this is a large amount of soup you are making here.

Chop up all of the vegetables and the parsley into chunks.

Add the chicken legs to the top of the top of the soup mix, then cover with the vegetables. It should come up to near the top of the soup pan.

Add the stock to cover the vegetables, it should come to about half and inch from the top of the pan.

Bring the soup to the boil on a high heat, and m,ix everything together in the water.

Reduce the soup to a simmer on a medium to low heat, and allow to cook for 1 hour, mixing the soup with a spoon every 15mins, you know, to add some love into that bad boy.

After an hour, take out the chicken legs and shred the meat from the bones, they have done their delicious work.

Add the chicken back into the soup, and cook for a further hour, until all of the lentils and barley have plumped up nicely. Serve with a smile!

Chicken and Vegetable Soup – Cookware

MasterClass Induction-Safe Stainless Steel Stock Pot With Lid, Silver, 8.5 Litre, 24 cm
Large Deep Stainless Steel Induction Stock Pot Casserole Cooking Stockpot (21 Litre)
Great on a Budget
Buckingham Stainless Steel Stock Pot Home Brew Pot Cooking Pot 21 cm / 6 Litre
Recommended
Circulon - Momentum - Stainless Steel Stock Pot With Lid - Total Non Stick - Induction Suitable - 24cm
MasterClass Induction-Safe Stainless Steel Stock Pot With Lid, Silver, 8.5 Litre, 24 cm
Large Deep Stainless Steel Induction Stock Pot Casserole Cooking Stockpot (21 Litre)
Buckingham Stainless Steel Stock Pot Home Brew Pot Cooking Pot 21 cm / 6 Litre
Circulon - Momentum - Stainless Steel Stock Pot With Lid - Total Non Stick - Induction Suitable - 24cm
£25.94
Price not available
£14.90
£44.99
-
-
MasterClass Induction-Safe Stainless Steel Stock Pot With Lid, Silver, 8.5 Litre, 24 cm
MasterClass Induction-Safe Stainless Steel Stock Pot With Lid, Silver, 8.5 Litre, 24 cm
£25.94
Large Deep Stainless Steel Induction Stock Pot Casserole Cooking Stockpot (21 Litre)
Large Deep Stainless Steel Induction Stock Pot Casserole Cooking Stockpot (21 Litre)
Price not available
-
Great on a Budget
Buckingham Stainless Steel Stock Pot Home Brew Pot Cooking Pot 21 cm / 6 Litre
Buckingham Stainless Steel Stock Pot Home Brew Pot Cooking Pot 21 cm / 6 Litre
£14.90
-
Recommended
Circulon - Momentum - Stainless Steel Stock Pot With Lid - Total Non Stick - Induction Suitable - 24cm
Circulon - Momentum - Stainless Steel Stock Pot With Lid - Total Non Stick - Induction Suitable - 24cm
£44.99

Chicken and Vegetable Soup – Ingredient Breakdown

Celery

Photo by Alexandr Podvalny on Unsplash

Celery (Apium graveolens) is a marshland plant in the family Apiaceae that has been cultivated as a vegetable since antiquity. 

Celery has a long fibrous stalk tapering into leaves. Depending on location and cultivar, either its stalks, leaves or hypocotyl are eaten and used in cooking. 

Celery seed is also used as a spice and its extracts have been used in herbal medicine.

With thank to our friends at Wikipedia

Carrots

Photo by Gabriel Gurrola on Unsplash

The carrot (Daucus carota subsp. sativus) is a root vegetable, usually orange in colour, though purple, black, red, white, and yellow cultivars exist. 

They are a domesticated form of the wild carrot, Daucus carota, native to Europe and Southwestern Asia. 

The plant probably originated in Persia and was originally cultivated for its leaves and seeds. The most commonly eaten part of the plant is the taproot, although the stems and leaves are eaten as well. 

The domestic carrot has been selectively bred for its greatly enlarged, more palatable, less woody-textured taproot.

The carrot is a biennial plant in the umbellifer family Apiaceae. 

At first, it grows a rosette of leaves while building up the enlarged taproot. 

Fast-growing cultivars mature within three months (90 days) of sowing the seed, while slower-maturing cultivars need a month longer (120 days). 

The roots contain high quantities of alpha- and beta-carotene, and are a good source of vitamin K and vitamin B6, but the belief that eating carrots improves night vision is a myth put forward by the British in World War II to mislead the enemy about their military capabilities.

With thanks to our friends at Wikipedia

Leeks

Photo by Lucy May on Unsplash

The leek is a vegetable, a cultivar of Allium ampeloprasum, the broadleaf wild leek. 

The edible part of the plant is a bundle of leaf sheaths that is sometimes erroneously called a stem or stalk. 

The genus Allium also contains the onion, garlic, shallot, scallion, chive, and Chinese onion.

With thanks to our friends at Wikipedia

Lentils

Photo by Gaelle Marcel on Unsplash

The lentil (Lens culinaris or Lens esculenta) is an edible legume. It is a bushy annual plant known for its lens-shaped seeds. 

It is about 40 cm (16 in) tall, and the seeds grow in pods, usually with two seeds in each. 

As a food crop, the majority of world production comes from Canada, India, and Turkey.

In cuisines of the Indian subcontinent, where lentils are a staple, split lentils (often with their hulls removed) are often cooked into a thick gravy that is usually eaten with rice or rotis.

With thanks to our friends at Wikipedia

Split Peas

Split peas are an agricultural or culinary preparation consisting of the dried, peeled and split seeds of Pisum sativum, the pea.

With thanks to our friends at Wikipedia

Barley

Photo by Samet Kurtkus on Unsplash

Barley (Hordeum vulgare), a member of the grass family, is a major cereal grain grown in temperate climates globally. 

It was one of the first cultivated grains, particularly in Eurasia as early as 10,000 years ago. 

Barley has been used as animal fodder, as a source of fermentable material for beer and certain distilled beverages, and as a component of various health foods. 

It is used in soups and stews, and in barley bread of various cultures. Barley grains are commonly made into malt in a traditional and ancient method of preparation.

In 2017, barley was ranked fourth among grains in quantity produced (149 million tonnes) behind maize, rice and wheat.

With thanks to our friends at Wikipedia

Chicken and Vegetable Soup – Bonus Recipe

Do you want the full recipe for this? If so, click Here!

Chicken and Vegetable Soup – FAQ

Can you put raw chicken in soup?

Yes, you can as long as it is long enough to heat tit to a safe temperature. Because this soup recipe boils and simmers for a long time, it is totally safe.

How long should I cook it for?

General rule of thumb is 30 minutes to make sure the chicken is cooked, but my Mum usually leaves it on the stove on a low heat all day, and we dip in when we need to.

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