chicken caesar salad

Chicken Caesar Salad

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It is fair to say, being a FatLad, salad wouldn’t be my first place to go when looking for a healthy meal. Yet I come back time and time again, to my Chicken Caesar Salad. 

Why? Well it was something I first tried in a restaurant one day, because I was sick of the same old chicken dinners. Chicken Caesar Salad, although not very new , was new to me, and what a revelation it was! 

So now I have made my own Chicken Caesar Salad, semi-healthy version, using yogurt instead of mayo, in a bid to try and cut down the calories, but keep the taste. 

So I guess Salad is my friend after all.

Chicken Caesar Salad – Recipe

Ingredients

For the Dressing

  • 1 Clove of Garlic
  • 2 tablespoons Greek Yogurt
  • 1 tablespoon Olive Oil
  • 50 grams Parmesan
  • 1 splash Lemon
  • Salt & Pepper

For the Salad

  • 2 Chicken Breasts
  • 4 Rashers of Bacon
  • 2 Eggs
  • 1/2 Lettuce
  • 2 Spring Onions
  • 2 pieces Bread

Directions#

Pre-heat your oven to 200C/400F/Gas Mark 5.

Bash the chicken into thinner breasts, using some grease-proof paper and a rolling pin.

Salt & Pepper both sides to your own taste

Grill on both sides using a grill pan, and then place in the oven for 15mins. Do the same with the bacon, you want it to be nice and crispy. Put two eggs in a saucepan with water, to boil for 15mins on a high heat, rolling boil.

To Make the Dressing

Crush the garlic clove in a pestle and mortar.

Add the yogurt, and mix well with the garlic paste.

Add in the oil, lemon juice, grated Parmesan and seasoning.

Give it a final mix and leave to the side to get acquainted with one another.

To Build the Salad

Chop up the lettuce and spring onion and add to a salad bowl.

Toast both slices of bread in the oven, so they are toasted right through.

Chop the eggs and toast and add to the salad bowl.

Chop up the chicken and bacon, and add to the salad bowl.

Drizzle all of the dressing over the salad, and then combine thoroughly.

Serve your Chicken Caesar Salad to your family!

Chicken Caesar Salad – Cookware

Tefal Extra Grill Pan, 26 cm - Black
Savisto 28cm Premium Cast Aluminium Non-Stick Griddle Pan for Gas, Induction & Electric Hobs with Detachable Handle – 2 Year Guarantee, Black, 29 x 50 x 4 cm
VonShef Griddle Pan - Cast Aluminium 28cm Non Stick Easy Clean - Suitable for All Hobs Including Induction
Recommended
VonShef Cast Iron Griddle Pan - Non Stick Black Pre-Seasoned 26cm Square Grill Pan - Suitable for All Hob Types
Tefal Extra Grill Pan, 26 cm - Black
Savisto 28cm Premium Cast Aluminium Non-Stick Griddle Pan for Gas, Induction & Electric Hobs with Detachable Handle – 2 Year Guarantee, Black, 29 x 50 x 4 cm
VonShef Griddle Pan - Cast Aluminium 28cm Non Stick Easy Clean - Suitable for All Hobs Including Induction
VonShef Cast Iron Griddle Pan - Non Stick Black Pre-Seasoned 26cm Square Grill Pan - Suitable for All Hob Types
£19.99
£21.95
£24.99
Price not available
-
-
-
Tefal Extra Grill Pan, 26 cm - Black
Tefal Extra Grill Pan, 26 cm - Black
£19.99
Savisto 28cm Premium Cast Aluminium Non-Stick Griddle Pan for Gas, Induction & Electric Hobs with Detachable Handle – 2 Year Guarantee, Black, 29 x 50 x 4 cm
Savisto 28cm Premium Cast Aluminium Non-Stick Griddle Pan for Gas, Induction & Electric Hobs with Detachable Handle – 2 Year Guarantee, Black, 29 x 50 x 4 cm
£21.95
-
VonShef Griddle Pan - Cast Aluminium 28cm Non Stick Easy Clean - Suitable for All Hobs Including Induction
VonShef Griddle Pan - Cast Aluminium 28cm Non Stick Easy Clean - Suitable for All Hobs Including Induction
£24.99
-
Recommended
VonShef Cast Iron Griddle Pan - Non Stick Black Pre-Seasoned 26cm Square Grill Pan - Suitable for All Hob Types
VonShef Cast Iron Griddle Pan - Non Stick Black Pre-Seasoned 26cm Square Grill Pan - Suitable for All Hob Types
Price not available
-

Chicken Caesar Salad – Ingredient Breakdown

Chicken

Photo by Tim Bish on Unsplash

More than 50 billion chickens are reared annually as a source of meat and eggs. In the United States alone, more than 8 billion chickens are slaughtered each year for meat, and more than 300 million chickens are reared for egg production.

The vast majority of poultry are raised in factory farms. According to the Worldwatch Institute, 74 percent of the world’s poultry meat and 68 percent of eggs are produced this way. An alternative to intensive poultry farming is free-range farming.

Friction between these two main methods has led to long-term issues of ethical consumerism. Opponents of intensive farming argue that it harms the environment, creates human health risks and is inhumane. Advocates of intensive farming say that their highly efficient systems save land and food resources owing to increased productivity, and that the animals are looked after in state-of-the-art environmentally controlled facilities.

Chickens farmed for meat are called broilers. Chickens will naturally live for six or more years, but broiler breeds typically take less than six weeks to reach slaughter size. A free range or organic broiler will usually be slaughtered at about 14 weeks of age.

Chickens farmed primarily for eggs are called layer hens. In total, the UK alone consumes more than 34 million eggs per day.

Some hen breeds can produce over 300 eggs per year, with “the highest authenticated rate of egg laying being 371 eggs in 364 days”. 

After 12 months of laying, the commercial hen’s egg-laying ability starts to decline to the point where the flock is commercially unviable. Hens, particularly from battery cage systems, are sometimes infirm or have lost a significant amount of their feathers, and their life expectancy has been reduced from around seven years to less than two years.

In the UK and Europe, laying hens are then slaughtered and used in processed foods or sold as “soup hens”.

In some other countries, flocks are sometimes force moulted, rather than being slaughtered, to re-invigorate egg-laying. This involves complete withdrawal of food (and sometimes water) for 7–14 days or sufficiently long to cause a body weight loss of 25 to 35%, or up to 28 days under experimental conditions.

This stimulates the hen to lose her feathers, but also re-invigorates egg-production. Some flocks may be force-moulted several times. In 2003, more than 75% of all flocks were moulted in the US.

With thanks to our friends at Wikipedia

Bacon

Bacon is a type of salt-cured pork.

Bacon is prepared from several different cuts of meat, typically from the pork belly or from back cuts, which have less fat than the belly. It is eaten on its own, as a side dish (particularly in breakfasts), or used as a minor ingredient to flavour dishes (e.g., the club sandwich). 

Bacon is also used for barding and larding roasts, especially game, including venison and pheasant. 

The word is derived from the Old High German bacho, meaning “buttock”, “ham” or “side of bacon”, and is cognate with the Old French bacon.

Meat from other animals, such as beef, lamb, chicken, goat, or turkey, may also be cut, cured, or otherwise prepared to resemble bacon, and may even be referred to as, for example, “turkey bacon”.

Such use is common in areas with significant Jewish and Muslim populations as both religions prohibit the consumption of pork.

Vegetarian bacons such as “soy bacon” also exist and attract vegetarians and vegans.

With thanks to our friends at Wikipedia

Lettuce

Photo by Agence Producteurs Locaux Damien Kühn on Unsplash

Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) is an annual plant of the daisy family, Asteraceae. 

It is most often grown as a leaf vegetable, but sometimes for its stem and seeds. 

Lettuce is most often used for salads, although it is also seen in other kinds of food, such as soups, sandwiches and wraps; it can also be grilled.

One variety, the woju (莴苣), or asparagus lettuce (Celtuce), is grown for its stems, which are eaten either raw or cooked. In addition to its main use as a leafy green, it has also gathered religious and medicinal significance over centuries of human consumption. 

Europe and North America originally dominated the market for lettuce, but by the late 20th century the consumption of lettuce had spread throughout the world. 

World production of lettuce and chicory for calendar year 2017 was 27 million tonnes, 56% of which came from China.

With thanks to.our friends at Wikipedia

Spring Onion

Photo by Peter Wendt on Unsplash

Scallions (also known as green onions, spring onions, or salad onions) are vegetables of various Allium onion species. 

Scallions have a milder taste than most onions. Their close relatives include garlic, shallot, leek, chive, and Chinese onion.

Although the bulbs of many Allium species are used as food, the defining characteristic of scallion species is that they lack a fully developed bulb. 

Allium species referred to as scallions have hollow, tubular green leaves growing directly from the bulb. 

These leaves are used as a vegetable; they are eaten either raw or cooked. 

The leaves are often chopped into other dishes, in the manner of onions or garlic.

With thanks to.our friends at Wikipedia

Lemon

The lemon, Citrus limon (L.) Osbeck, is a species of small evergreen tree in the flowering plant family Rutaceae, native to South Asia, primarily North eastern India.

The tree’s ellipsoidal yellow fruit is used for culinary and non-culinary purposes throughout the world, primarily for its juice, which has both culinary and cleaning uses.

The pulp and rind are also used in cooking and baking. The juice of the lemon is about 5% to 6% citric acid, with a pH of around 2.2, giving it a sour taste. 

The distinctive sour taste of lemon juice makes it a key ingredient in drinks and foods such as lemonade and lemon meringue pie.

With thanks to our friends at Wikipedia

Parmesan Cheese

Parmigiano-Reggiano or Parmesan is an Italian hard, granular cheese. 

In the European Economic Area, the name “Parmesan” is legally defined as PDO Parmigiano-Reggiano, though it is often used outside Europe for similar non-PDO cheeses.

It is named after the producing areas, the provinces of Parma, Reggio Emilia, the part of Bologna west of the Reno, and Modena (all in Emilia-Romagna); and the part of Mantua (Lombardy) south of the Po. Both “Parmigiano-Reggiano” and “Parmesan” are protected designations of origin (PDO) for cheeses produced in these provinces under Italian and European law. 

Parmigiano is the Italian adjective for Parma and Reggiano that for Reggio Emilia. 

Outside the EU, the name “Parmesan” can legally be used for similar cheeses, with only the full Italian name unambiguously referring to PDO Parmigiano-Reggiano.

It has been called the “King of Cheeses”[2] and a “practically perfect food”.

With thanks to our friends at Wikipedia

Eggs

Photo by Jakub Kapusnak on Unsplash

Some eggs are laid by female animals of many different species, including birds, reptiles, amphibians, mammals, and fish, and have been eaten by humans for thousands of years.

Bird and reptile eggs consist of a protective eggshell, albumen (egg white), and vitellus (egg yolk), contained within various thin membranes. The most commonly consumed eggs are chicken eggs. 

Other poultry eggs including those of duck and quail also are eaten. Fish eggs are called roe and caviar.

Egg yolks and whole eggs store significant amounts of protein and choline, and are widely used in cookery. 

Due to their protein content, the United States Department of Agriculture formerly categorized eggs as Meats within the Food Guide Pyramid (now MyPlate).

Despite the nutritional value of eggs, there are some potential health issues arising from cholesterol content, salmonella contamination, and allergy to egg proteins.

Chickens and other egg-laying creatures are kept widely throughout the world and mass production of chicken eggs is a global industry. 

In 2009, an estimated 62.1 million metric tons of eggs were produced worldwide from a total laying flock of approximately 6.4 billion hens.

There are issues of regional variation in demand and expectation, as well as current debates concerning methods of mass production. 

In 2012, the European Union banned battery husbandry of chickens.

With thanks to our friends at Wikipedia

Chicken Caesar Salad – Bonus Video

Why not add some spice to your Chicken Caesar Salad by making some Barbecue Chicken?

Chicken Caesar Salad – FAQ

Why is it called a Caesar Salad?

The salad’s creation is generally attributed to restaurateur Caesar Cardini, an Italian immigrant who operated restaurants in Mexico and the United States. Cardini was living in San Diego but he was also working in Tijuana where he avoided the restrictions of Prohibition.

His daughter Rosa recounted that her father invented the salad at his restaurant Caesar’s (at the Hotel Cesar) when a Fourth of July rush in 1924 depleted the kitchen’s supplies. Cardini made do with what he had, adding the dramatic flair of the table-side tossing “by the chef.”

A number of Cardini’s staff have said that they invented the dish.

Is a Chicken Caesar Salad healthy for me?

In this case, with this recipe, then yes it is because I have made it that way.

However, if you love it as much as I do (ask my wife) then I have to tell you it is not the healthiest when you take into account having it in restaurants.

Other Chicken Recipes

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