quick souvlaki

Quick Souvlaki

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As you will no doubt notice, I have been going through a Greek phase in my cooking life, culminating with this recipe, my Quick Souvlaki.

This is my favourite Greek food out of them all, and it is one of the most delicious tastes you can imagine.

This is Quick Souvlaki though, and is built for those of us in a hurry, but it still tastes amazing!

Quick Souvlaki – The Recipe

Ingredients

  • 3 cups Self Raising Flour
  • 2/3 cup Tepid Milk
  • 1/2 cup Tepid Water
  • 7 grams Yeast
  • 1 teaspoon Salt
  • 1 teaspoon Sugar
  • 2 Chicken Breasts
  • 1 tablespoon Oregano
  • 1 tablespoon Olive Oil

Directions

Put the flour, yeast, salt & sugar into a mixing bowl and mix together thoroughly.

Add in the wet ingredients, and mix into a large dough ball.

Knead for 10mins.

Leave the dough in a well oiled bowl, for 2-3hours, until it has had time to prove.

When the proving period is over, knock back with your hands and roll out into a large sausage.

Cut into eight pieces, and using a rolling pin, flatten them into rounded flat-bread shapes.

Put a frying pan onto a high heat, and then place in one of the flat-breads.Cook on each side for 3mins, then turn over again for another 3mins.

Repeat until all of the flat-breads are cooked.

Pre-heat your oven to 200C/400f, place a grill pan onto a high heat for 20mins

Take the fillet of the chicken and put all of it into a bowl.

Cover in the oil, oregano, salt & pepper. Allow to marinade for 30mins.

Cook the chicken on the grill pan for 5mins on each side.

Put into the oven for a further 15mins, or until it is cooked.

When cooked, cut into slices and serve with the flat-breads, and a side salad.

Quick Souvlaki – Cookware

Tefal Extra Grill Pan, 26 cm - Black
Savisto 28cm Premium Cast Aluminium Non-Stick Griddle Pan for Gas, Induction & Electric Hobs with Detachable Handle – 2 Year Guarantee, Black, 29 x 50 x 4 cm
VonShef Griddle Pan - Cast Aluminium 28cm Non Stick Easy Clean - Suitable for All Hobs Including Induction
Recommended
VonShef Cast Iron Griddle Pan - Non Stick Black Pre-Seasoned 26cm Square Grill Pan - Suitable for All Hob Types
Tefal Extra Grill Pan, 26 cm - Black
Savisto 28cm Premium Cast Aluminium Non-Stick Griddle Pan for Gas, Induction & Electric Hobs with Detachable Handle – 2 Year Guarantee, Black, 29 x 50 x 4 cm
VonShef Griddle Pan - Cast Aluminium 28cm Non Stick Easy Clean - Suitable for All Hobs Including Induction
VonShef Cast Iron Griddle Pan - Non Stick Black Pre-Seasoned 26cm Square Grill Pan - Suitable for All Hob Types
£19.99
£21.95
£24.99
Price not available
-
-
-
Tefal Extra Grill Pan, 26 cm - Black
Tefal Extra Grill Pan, 26 cm - Black
£19.99
Savisto 28cm Premium Cast Aluminium Non-Stick Griddle Pan for Gas, Induction & Electric Hobs with Detachable Handle – 2 Year Guarantee, Black, 29 x 50 x 4 cm
Savisto 28cm Premium Cast Aluminium Non-Stick Griddle Pan for Gas, Induction & Electric Hobs with Detachable Handle – 2 Year Guarantee, Black, 29 x 50 x 4 cm
£21.95
-
VonShef Griddle Pan - Cast Aluminium 28cm Non Stick Easy Clean - Suitable for All Hobs Including Induction
VonShef Griddle Pan - Cast Aluminium 28cm Non Stick Easy Clean - Suitable for All Hobs Including Induction
£24.99
-
Recommended
VonShef Cast Iron Griddle Pan - Non Stick Black Pre-Seasoned 26cm Square Grill Pan - Suitable for All Hob Types
VonShef Cast Iron Griddle Pan - Non Stick Black Pre-Seasoned 26cm Square Grill Pan - Suitable for All Hob Types
Price not available
-

Quick Souvlaki – Ingredient Breakdown

Flour

Photo by Kristiana Pinne on Unsplash

Flour is a powder made by grinding raw grains, roots, beans, nuts, or seeds. It is used to make many different foods. 

Cereal flour is the main ingredient of bread, which is a staple food for most cultures. 

Wheat flour is one of the most important ingredients in Oceanic, European, South American, North American, Middle Eastern, North Indian and North African cultures, and is the defining ingredient in their styles of breads and pastries.

Wheat is the most common base for flour. 

Corn flour has been important in Mesoamerican cuisine since ancient times and remains a staple in the Americas. 

Rye flour is a constituent of bread in central Europe.

Cereal flour consists either of the endosperm, germ, and bran together (whole-grain flour) or of the endosperm alone (refined flour). 

Meal is either differentiable from flour as having slightly coarser particle size (degree of comminution) or is synonymous with flour; the word is used both ways. 

For example, the word cornmeal often connotes a grittier texture whereas corn flour connotes fine powder, although there is no codified dividing line.

With thanks to our friends at Wikipedia

Chicken

Photo by Ivana Cajina on Unsplash

More than 50 billion chickens are reared annually as a source of meat and eggs. In the United States alone, more than 8 billion chickens are slaughtered each year for meat, and more than 300 million chickens are reared for egg production.

The vast majority of poultry are raised in factory farms. According to the Worldwatch Institute, 74 percent of the world’s poultry meat and 68 percent of eggs are produced this way. An alternative to intensive poultry farming is free-range farming.

Friction between these two main methods has led to long-term issues of ethical consumerism. Opponents of intensive farming argue that it harms the environment, creates human health risks and is inhumane. Advocates of intensive farming say that their highly efficient systems save land and food resources owing to increased productivity, and that the animals are looked after in state-of-the-art environmentally controlled facilities.

Chickens farmed for meat are called broilers. Chickens will naturally live for six or more years, but broiler breeds typically take less than six weeks to reach slaughter size. A free range or organic broiler will usually be slaughtered at about 14 weeks of age.

Chickens farmed primarily for eggs are called layer hens. In total, the UK alone consumes more than 34 million eggs per day.

Some hen breeds can produce over 300 eggs per year, with “the highest authenticated rate of egg laying being 371 eggs in 364 days”. 

After 12 months of laying, the commercial hen’s egg-laying ability starts to decline to the point where the flock is commercially unviable. Hens, particularly from battery cage systems, are sometimes infirm or have lost a significant amount of their feathers, and their life expectancy has been reduced from around seven years to less than two years.

In the UK and Europe, laying hens are then slaughtered and used in processed foods or sold as “soup hens”.

In some other countries, flocks are sometimes force moulted, rather than being slaughtered, to re-invigorate egg-laying. This involves complete withdrawal of food (and sometimes water) for 7–14 days or sufficiently long to cause a body weight loss of 25 to 35%, or up to 28 days under experimental conditions.

This stimulates the hen to lose her feathers, but also re-invigorates egg-production. Some flocks may be force-moulted several times. In 2003, more than 75% of all flocks were moulted in the US.

With thanks to our friends at Wikipedia

Oregano

Photo by Samee Anderson on Unsplash

Oregano (Origanum vulgare) is a flowering plant in the mint family (Lamiaceae). It is native to temperate Western and Southwestern Eurasia and the Mediterranean region.

Oregano is a perennial herb, growing from 20–80 cm (7.9–31.5 in) tall, with opposite leaves 1–4 cm (0.39–1.57 in) long. 

The flowers are purple, 3–4 mm (0.12–0.16 in) long, produced in erect spikes. It is sometimes called wild marjoram, and its close relative, O. majorana, is known as sweet marjoram.

Oregano is related to the herb marjoram, sometimes being referred to as wild marjoram. Oregano has purple flowers and spade-shaped, olive-green leaves. 

It is a perennial, although it is grown as an annual in colder climates, as it often does not survive the winter. 

Oregano is planted in early spring, the plants being spaced 30 cm (12 in) apart in fairly dry soil, with full sun. Oregano will grow in a pH range between 6.0 (mildly acidic) and 9.0 (strongly alkaline), with a preferred range between 6.0 and 8.0. 

It prefers a hot, relatively dry climate, but does well in other environments.

With thanks to our friends at Wikipedia

Yeast

Photo by Rodolfo Marques on Unsplash

Yeasts are eukaryotic, single-celled microorganisms classified as members of the fungus kingdom. The first yeast originated hundreds of millions of years ago, and at least 1,500 species are currently recognized.

They are estimated to constitute 1% of all described fungal species.

Yeasts are unicellular organisms that evolved from multicellular ancestors, with some species having the ability to develop multicellular characteristics by forming strings of connected budding cells known as pseudohyphae or false hyphae.

Yeast sizes vary greatly, depending on species and environment, typically measuring 3–4 µm in diameter, although some yeasts can grow to 40 µm in size

Most yeasts reproduce asexually by mitosis, and many do so by the asymmetric division process known as budding. With their single-celled growth habit, yeasts can be contrasted with molds, which grow hyphae. Fungal species that can take both forms (depending on temperature or other conditions) are called dimorphic fungi.

The yeast species Saccharomyces cerevisiae converts carbohydrates to carbon dioxide and alcohols in a process known as fermentation

The products of this reaction have been used in baking and the production of alcoholic beverages for thousands of years

S. cerevisiae is also an important model organism in modern cell biology research, and is one of the most thoroughly studied eukaryotic microorganisms. Researchers have cultured it in order to understand the biology of the eukaryotic cell and ultimately human biology in great detail

Other species of yeasts, such as Candida albicans, are opportunistic pathogens and can cause infections in humans. Yeasts have recently been used to generate electricity in microbial fuel cells and to produce ethanol for the biofuel industry.

Yeasts do not form a single taxonomic or phylogenetic grouping. 

The term “yeast” is often taken as a synonym for Saccharomyces cerevisiae  but the phylogenetic diversity of yeasts is shown by their placement in two separate phyla: the Ascomycota and the Basidiomycota

The budding yeasts or “true yeasts” are classified in the order Saccharomycetales within the phylum Ascomycota.

With thanks to our friends at Wikipedia

Milk

Photo by Wolfgang Rottmann on Unsplash

Milk is a nutrient-rich, white liquid food produced by the mammary glands of mammals. It is the primary source of nutrition for infant mammals (including humans who are breastfed) before they are able to digest other types of food

Early-lactation milk contains colostrum, which carries the mother’s antibodies to its young and can reduce the risk of many diseases. 

It contains many other nutrients including protein and lactose

Interspecies consumption of milk is not uncommon, particularly among humans, many of whom consume the milk of other mammals.

As an agricultural product, milk, also called dairy milk, is extracted from farm animals during or soon after pregnancy. Dairy farms produced about 730 million tonnes of milk in 2011, from 260 million dairy cows India is the world’s largest producer of milk, and is the leading exporter of skimmed milk powder, yet it exports few other milk products.

The ever increasing rise in domestic demand for dairy products and a large demand-supply gap could lead to India being a net importer of dairy products in the future New Zealand, Germany and the Netherlands are the largest exporters of milk products.China and Russia were the world’s largest importers of milk and milk products until 2016 when both countries became self-sufficient, contributing to a worldwide glut of milk.

Throughout the world, more than six billion people consume milk and milk products. Over 750 million people live in dairy farming households.

With thanks to our friends at Wikipedia

Quick Souvlaki – Bonus Recipe

Quick Souvlaki is nothing without flatbread, and my flatbread recipe is one I have been using for many years, especially for quick souvlaki, or even kofta.

Quick Souvlaki – FAQ

What is the difference between Souvlaki and Gyros?

It is very simple actually, as both are meats and veg in a flatbread or pitta. Souvlaki is pieces of meat grilled, whilst gyros is shaved from a vertical rotisserie.

What meat can you use in Souvlaki?

Well, all the meats really. Souvlaki is to do with how the meat is cooked.

Quick Souvlaki – Other Chicken Recipes