SLOW COOKER BUTTER CHICKEN

Slow Cooker Butter Chicken

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Slow Cooker Curry has become a bit of a regular on this recipe channel, and why not given they are so easy to make, which is why I love my Slow Cooker Butter Chicken.

This time, due to not being on a diet I am glad to say at the moment, I went for the fattest of them all, in my Slow Cooker Butter Chicken Curry Recipe.

It’s is so velvety and soft, yet very mild, which of course can be remedied by the addition of more chili’s.

But you really don’t need them.

Slow Cooker Butter Chicken – Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1 Chicken Breast, cut into chunks
  • 3tbsp Tumeric
  • 2tbsp Chili Powder
  • 2tbsp Cumin
  • 2tbsp Coriander
  • 2tbsp Garam Masala
  • 1tbsp Oregano
  • 3tbsp Tomato Paste
  • 1 tin of Tomatoes
  • 2 Onions, chunked
  • 5 cloves of Garlic
  • 1tsp Ginger
  • 125g Melted Butter
  • 2tbsp Yogurt
  • 75g finishing Butter

Nutritional Information

Based of 3 servings

Calories: 739kcal

Carbs: 37g

Fat: 62g

Protein: 18g

Directions

Add the onions, garlic, ginger, chilli powder and oil into a liquidiser, and blitz down to a paste.

Decant the paste into a mixing bowl, and add the melted butter and the remainder of the spices & herbs.

Mix thoroughly before adding the tomato puree and tinned tomatoes.

You are not looking for chunks of tomato here, so blitz them down to a sauce before adding if you need to.

Add the chicken into the slow cooker, and then cover with the sauce.

Cook on High for 4 hours, and then reduce to Low for the last 4 hours.

When cooked, mix thoroughly again, before adding the yogurt and finishing butter. Mix through until the butter has melted, and serve with rice and some flatbread.

Slow Cooker Butter Chicken – Cookware

Crock-Pot Lift and Serve Digital Slow Cooker with Hinged Lid and Programmable Countdown Timer, 4.7 Litre, CSC052
Recommended
Morphy Richards - 6.5L Silver Slowcooker
ANSIO Electric Pressure Cooker Programmable Electronic Multifunction Cooking Pot, Yogurt-Maker, Slow Cooker, Keeps Food hot - 5.5 Litre, 1000W, White & Black
Crock-Pot SCV400RD Slow Cooker, Removable Easy-Clean Ceramic Bowl, 3.5 Litre (3-4 People), Red
Crock-Pot Lift and Serve Digital Slow Cooker with Hinged Lid and Programmable Countdown Timer, 4.7 Litre, CSC052
Morphy Richards - 6.5L Silver Slowcooker
ANSIO Electric Pressure Cooker Programmable Electronic Multifunction Cooking Pot, Yogurt-Maker, Slow Cooker, Keeps Food hot - 5.5 Litre, 1000W, White & Black
Crock-Pot SCV400RD Slow Cooker, Removable Easy-Clean Ceramic Bowl, 3.5 Litre (3-4 People), Red
£32.28
£69.49
Price not available
£26.99
Crock-Pot Lift and Serve Digital Slow Cooker with Hinged Lid and Programmable Countdown Timer, 4.7 Litre, CSC052
Crock-Pot Lift and Serve Digital Slow Cooker with Hinged Lid and Programmable Countdown Timer, 4.7 Litre, CSC052
£32.28
Recommended
Morphy Richards - 6.5L Silver Slowcooker
Morphy Richards - 6.5L Silver Slowcooker
£69.49
ANSIO Electric Pressure Cooker Programmable Electronic Multifunction Cooking Pot, Yogurt-Maker, Slow Cooker, Keeps Food hot - 5.5 Litre, 1000W, White & Black
ANSIO Electric Pressure Cooker Programmable Electronic Multifunction Cooking Pot, Yogurt-Maker, Slow Cooker, Keeps Food hot - 5.5 Litre, 1000W, White & Black
Price not available
Crock-Pot SCV400RD Slow Cooker, Removable Easy-Clean Ceramic Bowl, 3.5 Litre (3-4 People), Red
Crock-Pot SCV400RD Slow Cooker, Removable Easy-Clean Ceramic Bowl, 3.5 Litre (3-4 People), Red
£26.99

Slow Cooker Butter Chicken – Ingredient Breakdown

Chicken

Photo by Ommy Jay on Unsplash

More than 50 billion chickens are reared annually as a source of meat and eggs. In the United States alone, more than 8 billion chickens are slaughtered each year for meat, and more than 300 million chickens are reared for egg production.

The vast majority of poultry are raised in factory farms. According to the Worldwatch Institute, 74 percent of the world’s poultry meat and 68 percent of eggs are produced this way. An alternative to intensive poultry farming is free-range farming.

Friction between these two main methods has led to long-term issues of ethical consumerism. Opponents of intensive farming argue that it harms the environment, creates human health risks and is inhumane. Advocates of intensive farming say that their highly efficient systems save land and food resources owing to increased productivity, and that the animals are looked after in state-of-the-art environmentally controlled facilities.

Chickens farmed for meat are called broilers. Chickens will naturally live for six or more years, but broiler breeds typically take less than six weeks to reach slaughter size. A free range or organic broiler will usually be slaughtered at about 14 weeks of age.

Chickens farmed primarily for eggs are called layer hens. In total, the UK alone consumes more than 34 million eggs per day.

Some hen breeds can produce over 300 eggs per year, with “the highest authenticated rate of egg laying being 371 eggs in 364 days”. 

After 12 months of laying, the commercial hen’s egg-laying ability starts to decline to the point where the flock is commercially unviable. Hens, particularly from battery cage systems, are sometimes infirm or have lost a significant amount of their feathers, and their life expectancy has been reduced from around seven years to less than two years.

In the UK and Europe, laying hens are then slaughtered and used in processed foods or sold as “soup hens”.

In some other countries, flocks are sometimes force moulted, rather than being slaughtered, to re-invigorate egg-laying. This involves complete withdrawal of food (and sometimes water) for 7–14 days or sufficiently long to cause a body weight loss of 25 to 35%, or up to 28 days under experimental conditions.

This stimulates the hen to lose her feathers, but also re-invigorates egg-production. Some flocks may be force-moulted several times. In 2003, more than 75% of all flocks were moulted in the US.

With thanks to our friends at Wikipedia

Onions

Photo by Eric Prouzet on Unsplash

The onion (Allium cepa L., from Latin cepa “onion”), also known as the bulb onion or common onion, is a vegetable that is the most widely cultivated species of the genus Allium. 

Its close relatives include the garlic, shallot, leek, chive, and Chinese onion.

This genus also contains several other species variously referred to as onions and cultivated for food, such as the Japanese bunching onion (Allium fistulosum), the tree onion (A. ×proliferum), and the Canada onion (Allium canadense). 

The name “wild onion” is applied to a number of Allium species, but A. cepa is exclusively known from cultivation. 

Its ancestral wild original form is not known, although escapes from cultivation have become established in some regions.

The onion is most frequently a biennial or a perennial plant, but is usually treated as an annual and harvested in its first growing season.

With thanks to our friends at Wikipedia

Tomato

Photo by Lars Blankers on Unsplash

The tomato is edible, often red, berry of the plant Solanum lycopersicum, commonly known as a tomato plant. The species originated in western South America and Central America.

The Nahuatl (Aztec language) word tomatl gave rise to the Spanish word tomate, from which the English word tomato derived.

Its domestication and use as a cultivated food may have originated with the indigenous peoples of Mexico.

The Aztecs used tomatoes in their cooking at the time of the Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire, and after the Spanish encountered the tomato for the first time after their contact with the Aztecs, they brought the plant to Europe. 

From there, the tomato was introduced to other parts of the European-colonized world during the 16th century.

Tomatoes are a significant source of umami flavor.

The tomato is consumed in diverse ways, raw or cooked, in many dishes, sauces, salads, and drinks. While tomatoes are fruits—botanically classified as berries—they are commonly used as a vegetable ingredient or side dish.

Numerous varieties of the tomato plant are widely grown in temperate climates across the world, with greenhouses allowing for the production of tomatoes throughout all seasons of the year. 

Tomato plants typically grow to 1–3 meters (3–10 ft) in height. They are vines that have a weak stem that sprawls and typically needs support.

Indeterminate tomato plants are perennials in their native habitat, but are cultivated as annuals. 

Determinate, or bush, plants are annuals that stop growing at a certain height and produce a crop all at once. 

The size of the tomato varies according to the cultivar, with a range of 0.5–4 inches (1.3–10.2 cm) in width.

With thanks to.our friends at Wikipedia

Garlic

Photo by Gaelle Marcel on Unsplash

Garlic (Allium sativum) is a species in the onion genus, Allium.

Its close relatives include the onion, shallot, leek, chive, and Chinese onion.

Garlic is native to Central Asia and northeastern Iran, and has long been a common seasoning worldwide, with a history of several thousand years of human consumption and use. 

It was known to ancient Egyptians, and has been used both as a food flavoring and as a traditional medicine.

In Ancient Rome, it was “much used for food among the poor”.

China produces some 80% of the world’s supply of garlic.

With thanks to our friends at Wikipedia

Oregano

Photo by Samee Anderson on Unsplash

Oregano (Origanum vulgare) is a flowering plant in the mint family (Lamiaceae). It is native to temperate Western and Southwestern Eurasia and the Mediterranean region.

Oregano is a perennial herb, growing from 20–80 cm (7.9–31.5 in) tall, with opposite leaves 1–4 cm (0.39–1.57 in) long. 

The flowers are purple, 3–4 mm (0.12–0.16 in) long, produced in erect spikes. It is sometimes called wild marjoram, and its close relative, O. majorana, is known as sweet marjoram.

Oregano is related to the herb marjoram, sometimes being referred to as wild marjoram. Oregano has purple flowers and spade-shaped, olive-green leaves. 

It is a perennial, although it is grown as an annual in colder climates, as it often does not survive the winter. 

Oregano is planted in early spring, the plants being spaced 30 cm (12 in) apart in fairly dry soil, with full sun. Oregano will grow in a pH range between 6.0 (mildly acidic) and 9.0 (strongly alkaline), with a preferred range between 6.0 and 8.0. 

It prefers a hot, relatively dry climate, but does well in other environments.

With thanks to our friends at Wikipedia

Slow Cooker Butter Chicken Curry – Bonus Recipe

I mean, if you like this curry, you might as well try this one!

Other Chicken Recipes